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Keywords:

  • adolescence;
  • risk factors;
  • smoking

Objective:  To examine concurrent physical, educational, behavioural, social and family factors associated with cigarette smoking in adolescents at 14 years.

Methodology:  This study reports cross-sectional data on 14-year-old adolescents and their mothers, drawn from a prospective cohort study commencing at the time of the first antenatal visit. At 14 years, 5247 adolescents completed questionnaires on current cigarette smoking. Adolescents and mothers completed health, psychological, school and social questionnaires relating to the youth. A total of 3864 adolescents were assessed physically, and undertook the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) and Ravens Progressive Matrices Test.

Results:  Cigarette smoking at 14 years was associated with externalizing and internalizing behaviour problems, school suspension, contact with children's services and alcohol/illicit drug use. Apart from internalizing behaviour problems, these problems were more prevalent in boys. Poor school performance on maternal/adolescent reports was associated with increased smoking quantity for both genders, though WRAT scores were only decreased in male smokers. The Ravens Progressive Matrices Test scores were lower for boys with greater smoking quantity. The trend was less marked in girls. Body mass index and exercise frequency were not associated with cigarette smoking at 14 years, though girls who smoked had a higher reported prevalence of asthma. Parental smoking, marital conflict, maternal depression, lower income, and mothers aged in their teens and with a lower level of education at the time of this pregnancy were also positively associated with adolescent tobacco use.

Conclusion:  Findings of this study indicate that cigarette smoking, at this critical time of smoking initiation, is associated with a broad spectrum of personal and social disadvantage that needs to be considered in intervention strategies.