Mutation and association analysis of the DAP-1 gene with schizophrenia

Authors

  • Shinsuke Aoyama , MD,

    1. Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
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  • Osamu Shirakawa , MD, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
      address: Dr Osamu Shirakawa, Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-Ku, Kobe 650-0017, Japan.
      Email: sirakawa@kobe-u.ac.jp
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  • Hisae Ono , MD, PhD,

    1. Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
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  • Takeshi Hashimoto , MD, PhD,

    1. Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
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  • Yasuo Kajimoto , MD, PhD,

    1. Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
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  • Kiyoshi Maeda , MD, PhD

    1. Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
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address: Dr Osamu Shirakawa, Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-Ku, Kobe 650-0017, Japan.
Email: sirakawa@kobe-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Glutamate dysfunction has been hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The human homolog of Drosophila discs large protein (hDLG) and post-synaptic density-95-associated protein-1 (DAP-1) is one of the major proteins that are involved in intracellular signal transduction via N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. In the present study 33 Japanese patients with schizophrenia were screened for mutations in the DAP-1 gene. A single nucleotide polymorphism was identified in the DAP-1 gene (1618A/G). A case–control study using a larger sample of unrelated patients and controls did not reveal a significant association between this polymorphism and schizophrenia. The results do not provide evidence that the DAP-1 gene is involved in vulnerability to schizophrenia.

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