Free polyamine concentrations in coastal seawater during phytoplankton bloom

Authors

  • Naoyoshi Nishibori,

    Corresponding author
    1. Shikoku University Junior College, Shikoku University, Ojin, Tokushima 771-1192,
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  • Akihiko Yuasa,

    1. Naruto Branch, Tokushima Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Naruto, Tokushima, 771-0361 and
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    • aPresent address: Fisheries Division Tokushima Prefectural Government, Bandai, Tokushima 770-8570, Japan.

  • Motosuke Sakai,

    1. Naruto Branch, Tokushima Prefectural Fisheries Experimental Station, Naruto, Tokushima, 771-0361 and
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    • aPresent address: Fisheries Division Tokushima Prefectural Government, Bandai, Tokushima 770-8570, Japan.

  • Shinsuke Fujihara,

    1. Laboratory of Natural Resources Management, Shikoku National Agricultural Experiment Station, Zentuzi, Hyogo 675-0053, Japan
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  • Sachio Nishio

    1. Shikoku University Junior College, Shikoku University, Ojin, Tokushima 771-1192,
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*Corresponding author: Tel: 81-88-665-8037. Fax: 81-88-665-1300. Email: n-nishibori@shikoku-u.ac.jp

Abstract

SUMMARY: Polyamines are widely distributed in nature and known to have many roles in living organisms. We investigated the concentrations of polyamines together with inorganic nutrients during a summer bloom period in the Seto Inland Sea of Japan. Putrescine and spermidine were the major polyamines in the coastal seawater. The concentrations at 1 m depth varied widely during the sampling period and ranged from 2.0 to 32.6 nM and 1.0 to 14.1 nM. Spermine concentrations were much lower than putrescine and spermidine. In addition, other polyamines (diaminopropane, cadaverine, norspermidine, homospermidine, norspermine) were also detected. Putrescine and spermidine seemed to be significant compounds in dissolved organic nitrogen in coastal seawater.

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