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Characteristic features of the nocturnal sleeping posture of healthy men

Authors

  • Tomio KUBOTA,

    1. Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Social Services, Saitama Prefectural University, Koshigaya, Saitama,
    2. Department of Biocybernetics, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo,
    3. Department of Psychophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Ichikawa, Chiba and
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  • Nobuo OHSHIMA,

    1. Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Social Services, Saitama Prefectural University, Koshigaya, Saitama,
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  • Naoko KUNISAWA,

    1. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Social Services, Saitama Prefectural University, Koshigaya, Saitama, Japan
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  • Ryoko MURAYAMA,

    1. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Social Services, Saitama Prefectural University, Koshigaya, Saitama, Japan
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  • Shukan OKANO,

    1. Department of Biocybernetics, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo,
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  • Junko MORI-OKAMOTO

    1. Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Social Services, Saitama Prefectural University, Koshigaya, Saitama,
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Dr T Kubota, Department of Occupational Therapy, Saitama Prefectural University, 820 Sannomiya, Kosigaya-shi, Saitama 343-8540, Japan. Email: kubota-tomio@spu.ac.jp

Abstract

To investigate the frequency of ‘rolling over’ in bed and to clarify sleeping posture characteristics in nocturnal sleep, the sleeping positions of 19 healthy men were videotaped over 7 h (0:00–7:00 hours) for two consecutive nights. Sleeping habits and the degree of satisfaction upon awakening were also surveyed by using questionnaires. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.60, P < 0.01) was observed between the most favorite hypnogenetic position of the body and the most frequently observed position of the head during nocturnal sleep. Furthermore, sleeping positions varied from individual to individual, and the same subject slept showing similar positions and roll over frequencies to those on the day before.

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