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Cellular response to texture and form defined by motion in area 19 of the cat

Authors

  • Paul S. Khayat,

    1. Groupe de Recherche en Neuropsychologie Expérimentale, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Dave Saint-Amour,

    1. Groupe de Recherche en Neuropsychologie Expérimentale, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Stéphane Molotchnikoff,

    1. Groupe de Recherche en Neuropsychologie Expérimentale, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Franco Lepore,

    1. Groupe de Recherche en Neuropsychologie Expérimentale, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
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  • Jean-Paul Guillemot

    1. Groupe de Recherche en Neuropsychologie Expérimentale, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
    2. Département de Kinanthropologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, C. P. 8888, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3P8
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: Dr J.-P. Guillemot, Département de Kinanthropologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, C. P. 8888, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3P8.
E-mail: r10475@nobel.si.uqam.ca

Abstract

The present study examined the neuronal sensitivity in area 19 of the cat to a motion-defined bar and to texture. Sensitivity was tested in normal, lesioned (areas 17–18) and split-chiasm cats using a kinematogram, as well as a textured bar drifting on a uniform light background and a light bar drifting on a stationary textured background. Texture density was varied. The results indicate that almost all cells of area 19 recorded in the three groups of cats responded to a motion-defined bar or to its edges. Texture density influenced the responses in that the discharge rate increased as density decreased. However, the majority of cells were sensitive to the highest texture density kinematogram. Moreover, the neural responses of all cats were either independent of the density of the textured bar or background, or were modulated by it. These results show that cells in area 19 can signal the presence of a kinetic bar and that the density of either the textured bar, the background or both can influence figure–ground detection. The results are interpreted with respect to how various inputs influence the function of area 19.

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