• brain-derived neurotrophic factor;
  • exercise;
  • hippocampus;
  • microarray;
  • neuronal plasticity


Studies were performed to determine the effects of acute and chronic voluntary periods of exercise on the expression of hippocampal genes. RNAs from rodents exposed to a running wheel for 3, 7 and 28 days were examined using a microarray with 1176 cDNAs expressed primarily in the brain. The expression of selected genes was quantified by Taqman RT-PCR or RNase protection assay. The largest up-regulation was observed in genes involved with synaptic trafficking (synapsin I, synaptotagmin and syntaxin); signal transduction pathways (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, CaM-KII; mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, MAP-K/ERK I and II; protein kinase C, PKC-δ) or transcription regulators (cyclic AMP response element binding protein, CREB). Genes associated with the glutamatergic system were up-regulated (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, NMDAR-2A and NMDAR-2B and excitatory amino acid carrier 1, EAAC1), while genes related to the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system were down-regulated (GABAA receptor, glutamate decarboxylase GAD65). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was the only trophic factor whose gene was consistently up-regulated at all timepoints. These results, together with the fact that most of the genes up-regulated have a recognized interaction with BDNF, suggest a central role for BDNF on the effects of exercise on brain plasticity. The temporal profile of gene expression seems to delineate a mechanism by which specific molecular pathways are activated after exercise performance. For example, the CaM-K signal system seems to be active during acute and chronic periods of exercise, while the MAP-K/ERK system seems more important during long-term exercise.