Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Pulmonary Veins in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Controls:

Morphological Characteristics of Different Veins

Authors


Address for reprints: Andrea Natale, M.D., Director, Electrophysiology Laboratories, Dept. of Cardiology, Section of Pacing and Electrophysiology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Desk F-15, Cleveland, OH 44195. Fax: (216) 445-6156; e-mail: natalea@ccf.org

Abstract

PEREZ-LUGONES, A., et al.: Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Pulmonary Veins in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Controls: Morphological Characteristics of Different Veins.Multidetector computed tomography can be used to evaluate the anatomy of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with AF. The study evaluated two groups. Group 1 included 61 patients assessed following PV ablation with ultrasound or RF energy. Group 2 included 15 patients undergoing ablation for AF and 14 control subjects without a history of AF matched for age and sex. The anatomy of the PVs was analyzed in this group prior to the ablation and compared to controls. Computed tomography was used to measure the ostium of the left superior, left inferior, right superior, right inferior PVs, and the left atrial appendage size. In group 1, PV stenosis was seen in 14 (30%) of 46 patients undergoing ablation with RF energy and in none of the 15 patients receiving ablation with ultrasound energy. In group 2, the ostium size was not different between patients with AF and controls. Similarly, the ostium of the PV that appeared to trigger AF was not larger than the ostium of the remaining veins. A “clustering pattern” of PV branches near the right inferior PV ostium was seen in almost every patient, independent of the presence of the arrhythmia. Computed tomography frequently detects PV stenosis following RF ablation. Ultrasound ablation does not appear to result in PV narrowing. Overall, patients with AF do not have larger sizes of PV ostia. Multiple ramifications from the right inferior PV ostium is a common pattern and may represent a protective anatomic variant. (PACE 2003;26[Pt. I]:8–15)

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