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A comparison of corneal sensitivity between brachycephalic and Domestic Short-haired cats

Authors

  • Tiffany Blocker,

    1. Department of Medicine, The Bobst Hospital of the Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, New York 10021, USA
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  • Alexandra Van Der Woerdt

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, The Bobst Hospital of the Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, New York 10021, USA
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Address communications to: Alexandra van der Woerdt 510 East 62nd Street New York NY, 10021USA Tel.: (212) 838–8100

Abstract

Abstract

Objective

To compare sensitivity of the central and peripheral cornea of brachycephalic and Domestic Short-haired (DSH) cats.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

Fifty DSH, thirteen Persian, and seven Himalayan cats.

Criteria for inclusion

Healthy DSH, Persian, or Himalayan cats older than 6 months, with a normal ophthalmic examination and Sno-strip values greater than or equal to 5 mm wetting/60 s.

Materials and methods

Corneal sensitivity was measured using a Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer. The cornea was touched using the tip of the monofilament, decreasing the fiber length in 5 mm increments until a blink reflex occurred. Corneal touch threshold was defined as the stimulus that elicited a corneal blink reflex greater than 50% of the time.

Results

Mean central and peripheral corneal touch threshold (CTT, ± SD in gm/mm2) for the DSH cats were 1.79 ± 2.33 and 5.01 ± 5.07 in the right eye (OD), and 1.74 ± 1.65 and 5.02 ± 4.55 in the left eye (OS). Mean central and peripheral CTT ± SD (gm/mm2) for the brachycephalic cats were 4.09 ± 5.29 and 6.18 ± 5.65 OD, and 3.18 ± 3.75 and 7.66 ± 6.24 OS. Statistical analysis of the data revealed a significantly higher CTT in the central (P = 0.019) and peripheral (P = 0.003) cornea of brachycephalic than DSH cats. When evaluated for gender, this difference persisted in female cats, but did not hold true for male cats. A significant difference in CTT was found between central and peripheral cornea within both groups of cats.

Conclusions

The central cornea is less sensitive in brachycephalic than DSH cats. The central cornea is more sensitive than the peripheral cornea in both brachycephalic and DSH cats.

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