SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • nocturnal enuresis;
  • full-spectrum therapy;
  • predictive factors

Objective  To investigate the initial efficacy and predictive factors of full-spectrum therapy in the treatment of children and young adolescents with nocturnal enuresis (NE).

Patients and methods  Combined therapy for NE comprises an enuresis alarm, bladder training, motivational therapy and pelvic floor muscle training, and is more effective than each of the components alone or than medical intervention. A total of 60 children and adolescents (aged 4–20 years) with NE were treated once a week with full-spectrum therapy for a maximum of 6 months.

Results  Overall the therapy was successful (14 consecutive dry nights) in 52 of 60 patients. At 30 days the cure rate was 33%, after 60 days 72% and after 98 days, 87%. The remaining 13% did not achieve 14 consecutive dry nights; seven patients improved, having fewer dry nights/week. One patient discontinued the treatment because of lack of motivation. In children with an initial maximum bladder capacity less than normal for age, the capacity increased from 53% of the normal maximum bladder capacity in week 1 to 88% at the end of treatment. Neither age, gender, sleep arousal, bladder capacity, family history and pathophysiological profile had any association with the success rate.

Conclusion  The short-term success rate of full-spectrum therapy for NE is high. Age, gender, sleep arousal, bladder capacity, family history and pathophysiological profile of enuresis are unrelated to the success of the intervention.