Improved glycaemic control by addition of glimepiride to metformin monotherapy in Type 2 diabetic patients

Authors


Dr Florence Fleury, Laboratoire Aventis, Département Médical Diabète 46, Quai de la Rapée 75601, Paris cedex 12, France. E-mail: florence.fleury@aventis.com

Abstract

Aim  To compare the effect of glimepiride in combination with metformin with monotherapy of each drug on glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetic patients.

Design and methods  Randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group multicentre study conducted in France. Type 2 diabetic patients aged 35–70 years inadequately controlled by metformin monotherapy 2550 mg daily for at least 4 weeks were randomized to either metformin, glimepiride or metformin and glimepiride.

Results  Three hundred and seventy-two patients aged 56 ± 8 years were treated for 5 months. Combination treatment was significantly more efficient in controlling HbA1c (% change + 0.07 ± 1.20 for metformin, + 0.27 ± 1.10 for glimepiride, −0.74 ± 0.96 for combination treatment, P < 0.001), fasting blood glucose (FBG) (mmol/l change + 0.8 ± 0.4 for metformin, + 0.7 ± 3.1 for glimepiride and −1.8 ± 2.2 for combination treatment, P < 0.001) and post-prandial blood glucose (PPBG) (mmol/l change + 1.1 ± 5.9 for metformin, + 0.1 ± 5.1 for glimepiride and −2.6 ± 3.9 for combination treatment, P < 0.001) than either glimepiride or metformin alone. There was no significant difference between metformin or glimepiride monotherapy with respect to the change in HbA1c or FBG; however, glimepiride was significantly more effective than metformin in reducing PPBG. The incidence of symptomatic hypoglycaemia was higher in the combination group than in either monotherapy group (P = 0.039).

Conclusions  Addition of glimepiride to metformin in Type 2 diabetic patients inadequately controlled by metformin alone resulted in superior glycaemic control compared with glimepiride or metformin monotherapy.

Diabet. Med. 18, 828–834 (2001)

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