Verne Grant and evolutionary studies of Aquilegia

Authors

  • Scott A. Hodges,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA; The White Mountain Research Station, 3000 East Line Street, Bishop, CA 93514 USA
      Author for correspondence: Scott A. Hodges Tel: +1 (805) 893 7813 Fax: +1 (805) 893 4724 Email: hodges@lifesci.ucsb.edu
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  • Michelle Fulton,

    1. Department of Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA; The White Mountain Research Station, 3000 East Line Street, Bishop, CA 93514 USA
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  • Ji Y. Yang,

    1. Department of Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA; The White Mountain Research Station, 3000 East Line Street, Bishop, CA 93514 USA
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  • Justen B. Whittall

    1. Department of Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA; The White Mountain Research Station, 3000 East Line Street, Bishop, CA 93514 USA
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Author for correspondence: Scott A. Hodges Tel: +1 (805) 893 7813 Fax: +1 (805) 893 4724 Email: hodges@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Summary

One of Verne Grant's lasting contributions to plant evolutionary biology has been the recognition that differences between plants in floral characters can have a dramatic impact on both pollinator visitation and pollen transfer and thus affect reproductive isolation between nascent plant species (collectively, floral isolation). Here we review some of the concepts and findings from Grant's work on floral isolation, particularly with respect to the genus Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae). It has now been over 50 yr since Grant first published on the role of floral isolation on reproductive isolation and speciation in Aquilegia and we compare and contrast his findings with our own work on this genus. We find that the data largely support Grant's findings and that Aquilegia will continue to offer great opportunities to learn about the processes of adaptation and speciation.

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