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Increased Neuronal β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression in Human Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Association with Interleukin-1α Immunoreactivity

Authors

  • Jin G. Sheng,

    1. Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Center,
    2. Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and
    3. Department of Neurology, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Second Medical University, Shanghai, China
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  • Frederick A. Boop,

    1. Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Center,
    2. Departments of Anatomy,
    3. Neurosurgery,
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  • Robert E. Mrak,

    1. Departments of Anatomy,
    2. Pathology, and
    3. Department of Veterans' Affairs Medical Center, Little Rock, Arkansas, U.S.A.; and
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  • W. Sue T. Griffin

    Corresponding author
    1. Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Center,
    2. Departments of Anatomy,
    3. Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to Prof. W. S. T. Griffin at Department of Pediatrics, Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, 800 Marshall Street, Little Rock, AR 72202-3591, U.S.A.

Abstract

Abstract: Levels of immunoreactive β-amyloid precursor protein and interleukin-1α were found to be elevated in surgically resected human temporal lobe tissue from patients with intractable epilepsy compared with postmortem tissue from neurologically unaffected patients (controls). In tissue from epileptics, the levels of the 135-kDa β-amyloid precursor protein isoform were elevated to fourfold (p < 0.05) those of controls and those of the 130-kDa isoform to threefold (p < 0.05), whereas those of the 120-kDa isoform (p > 0.05) were not different from control values. β-Amyloid precursor protein-immunoreactive neurons were 16 times more numerous, and their cytoplasm and proximal processes were more intensely immunoreactive in tissue sections from epileptics than controls (133 ± 12 vs. 8 ± 3/mm2; p < 0.001). However, neither β-amyloid precursor protein-immunoreactive dystrophic neurites nor β-amyloid deposits were found in this tissue. Interleukin-1α-immunoreactive cells (microglia) were three times more numerous in epileptics than in controls (80 ± 8 vs. 25 ± 5/mm2; p < 0.001), and these cells were often found adjacent to β-amyloid precursor protein-immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies. Our findings, together with functions established in vitro for interleukin-1, suggest that increased expression of this protein contributes to the increased levels of β-amyloid precursor protein in epileptics, thus indicating a potential role for both of these proteins in the neuronal dysfunctions, e.g., hyperexcitability, characteristic of epilepsy.

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