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Polymorphic microsatellite loci in the black-and-gold chromis, Neoglyphidodon nigroris (Teleostei: Pomacentridae)

Authors

  • Phillip C. Watts,

    Corresponding author
    1. Animal Genomics Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, The Biosciences Building, Crown Street, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
      Phill Watts. Fax: 44 (0) 151 795 4512; E-mail: p.c.watts@liv.ac.uk
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  • Paris Veltsos,

    1. Animal Genomics Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, The Biosciences Building, Crown Street, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
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  • Benjamin J. Soffa,

    1. Animal Genomics Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, The Biosciences Building, Crown Street, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
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  • Andrew B. Gill,

    1. Animal Genomics Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, The Biosciences Building, Crown Street, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
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    • *

      Present address: Institute of Water and Environment, Cranfield University, Silsoe, Bedford MK45 4DT, UK.

  • Stephen J. Kemp

    1. Animal Genomics Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, The Biosciences Building, Crown Street, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK
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Phill Watts. Fax: 44 (0) 151 795 4512; E-mail: p.c.watts@liv.ac.uk

Abstract

We describe 15 polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite loci in the black-and-gold chromis, Neoglyphidodon nigroris (Cuvier: Teleostei: Pomacentridae). Microsatellites were isolated from a partial genomic library that was enriched for CA repeat motifs. The 15 loci yielded between two and 23 alleles per locus in a sample of 16 fish from two forereef sites off the island of Hoga, Wakatobi National Park, Indonesia. Observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.13 to 1.00 and 0.24 to 0.98, respectively. These markers should allow us to discriminate between closely related individuals and also to assess the connectedness of populations of N. nigroris that inhabit different reefs.

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