Effect of age on the interaction between the AC/A and CA/C ratios

Authors

  • Mark Rosenfield,

    1. Department of Vision Sciences, State University of New York, State College of Optometry, 100 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010, USA
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    • *MBCO

  • Kenneth J. Ciuffreda,

    1. Department of Vision Sciences, State University of New York, State College of Optometry, 100 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010, USA
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  • Hai-Wen Chen

    1. Department of Vision Sciences, State University of New York, State College of Optometry, 100 East 24th Street, New York, NY 10010, USA
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Summary

A number of previous studies have examined the effects of age and the development of presbyopia on either the accommodative convergence to accommodation (AC/A) or convergent accommodation to convergence (CA/C) ratios. However, changes in the interaction of these oculomotor crosslinks with increasing age have received relatively little attention, especially over a wide age distribution. Accordingly, the present study examined both crosslink ratios in 42 subjects ranging from 22 to 65 years of age. A dual haploscope-optometer was used to measure accommodation and vergence. The response AC/A ratio showed a small but significant positive correlation with age in those subjects under 45 years of age, while no significant correlation was observed between the stimulus AC/A ratio and age for all subjects. The CA/C ratio exhibited a significant negative correlation with age for all subjects. Furthermore, a trend was observed for lower CA/C findings to be associated with higher response AC/A ratios. However, the two ratios were inversely but not reciprocally related, with the mean difference between the CA/C ratio and the reciprocal of the response AC/A ratio being significantly different from zero. These age-related changes in the output of the oculomotor crosslinks provide further evidence of the continual oculomotor adaptation that occurs concurrent with the loss of accommodative responsivity.

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