Nesting Success of a Neotropical Migrant in a Multiple-Use, Forested Landscape

Authors

  • Solon F. Morse,

    Corresponding author
    1. Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, U.S.A.
      Department of Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution, University of Illinois, 606 E. Healey, Champaign, IL 61820, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Scott K. Robinson

    1. Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 E. Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, U.S.A.
      Department of Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution, University of Illinois, 606 E. Healey, Champaign, IL 61820, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

 email s-morse@uiuc.edu

Abstract

Abstract: We studied the nesting success of an individually marked population of Kentucky Warblers (Oporornis formosus), a species that nests in disturbed and undisturbed forests, in a heterogeneous, managed forest site in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois from 1992 to 1995. We examined the effects of forest stand type (clearcuts of various ages, tree plantations, and older forest) and distance from habitat edges on rates of nest predation and brood parasitism by Brown-headed Cowbirds (  Molothrus ater). Brood parasitism levels gradually decreased from 60% to 3% ( nests) over a distance of 2 km from an agricultural edge proximal to a known cowbird foraging site (a pig feedlot), but they did not vary with distance from any other kinds of edges or with forest stand type. Rates of nest predation ( nests) did not vary with distance from any edges, but they were significantly lower in older forest than within even-aged clearcuts, a tree plantation, and in successional vegetation adjacent to a residential facility. These results suggest that, even in fragmented landscapes with high overall levels of parasitism and nest predation, management practices within and immediately adjacent to forest tracts can affect the nesting success of some species, but not necessarily as a simple function of distance from edge. For the Kentucky Warbler, our results suggest that a management strategy that avoids even-age silviculture and leaves core stands of older forest far from cowbird feeding areas can increase nesting success to levels similar to those measured in more forested landscapes.

Abstract

Resumen: Estudiamos el éxito de nidación de una problación individualmente marcada del Chipe Cachetinegro (Oporornis formosus), una especie que nida en bosques tanto perturbados como sin perturbar de un sitio foestal heterogéneo y manejado del Bosque Nacional Shawnee en el Sur de Illinois. Examinamos los efectos del tipo de área forestal (claraeos de varios tipos, plantaciones de árboles y bosques maduros) y de la distancia con el borde del hábitat en la tasa de depredación de nidos y el parasitismo de nidos por el baquero cabecicafé (  Molothrus ater). Los niveles de parasitismo disminuyeron gradualmente de un 60% a un 3% ( nidos) sobre una distancia de 2 Km desde un borde agricultural próximo a un sitio de forrajeo de baqueros (lote para alimentación de cerdos), pero no varió con la distancia de otros tipos de bordes o con el tipo de área forestal. La tasa de depredación de nidos ( nidos) no varió en base a la distancia con los bordes, pero fue significativamente mas baja en bosques maduros que dentro de los clareados de edades iguales, en una plantación de árboles y en vegetación sucesional adyacente a una zona residencial. Estos resultados sugieren que aún en paisajes fragmentados con niveles de parasitismo y depredación de nidos generalmente elevados, las prácticas de manejo dentro y en sitios immediatamente adyacentes a zonas forestales pueden afectar el éxito de nidada de algunas especies, pero no necesariamente como una simple función de la distancia al borde. Para el Chipe Cachetinegro, nuestros resultados sugieren que una estrategia de manejo que evite la silvicultura de edades iguales y que deje zonas de bosque maduro alejadas de los sitios de alimentación del baquero cabecicafé puede incrementar el éxito de nidación a niveles similares a aquellos medidos en paisajes con mayor área boscosa.

Ancillary