Avian Responses to Late-Season Grazing in a Shrub-Willow Floodplain

Authors

  • Thomas R. Stanley,

    Corresponding author
    1. U.S. Geological Survey, Midcontinent Ecological Science Center, Fort Collins, CO 80525–3400, U.S.A.
      * Author sequence decided by coin flip. Address correspondence to T. R. Stanley, email tom_stanley@usgs.gov
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Fritz L. Knopf

    1. U.S. Geological Survey, Midcontinent Ecological Science Center, Fort Collins, CO 80525–3400, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

* Author sequence decided by coin flip. Address correspondence to T. R. Stanley, email tom_stanley@usgs.gov

Abstract

Abstract: Riparian vegetation in western North America provides important habitat for breeding birds and valuable forage for grazing livestock. Whereas a number of studies have documented the response of riparian vegetation to the removal of cattle, few have experimentally evaluated specific grazing systems. We evaluated the responses of vegetation and breeding birds to two cycles of late-season (August–September) grazing followed by 34 months of rest on the Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado. We used a before-and-after control-impact (BACI) design, with two control (ungrazed) and two treatment ( grazed) pastures composing the experimental units. Vegetation characteristics and bird densities were quantified on sample plots prior to and following two cycles of the treatment. We found no statistical differences in vegetation change and few differences in bird-density change among pastures. Inspection of means for pastures, however, suggests that changes in shrub vigor and spatial pattern differed among ungrazed and grazed pastures and that changes in population density for three of the nine bird species and three guilds studied differed among pastures. Our results suggest that habitat for grazing-sensitive birds may be restored while still allowing late-season grazing, although the rate at which species are recovered will be slower than if all cattle are removed.

Abstract

Resumen: La vegetación riparia del occidente de Norte América proporciona hábitats importantes para aves reproductivas y forraje valioso para ganado. Mientras numerosos estudios han documentado la respuesta de la vegetación riparia a la remoción de ganado, pocos han evaluado sistemas específicos de forrajeo experimentalmente. Evaluamos las respuestas de la vegetación y de aves reproductivas en dos ciclos de pastoreo tardío (agosto-septiembre) seguidos de 34 meses de descanso en el Refugio de Vida Silvestre Nacional Arapaho, Colorado. Utilizamos un diseño antes y después, control de impacto (ADCI), con dos pastizales control (sin pastoreo) y dos tratamientos (con pastoreo) como unidades experimentales. Se cuantificaron las características de la vegetación y las densidades de aves en las parcelas de muestreo antes y después de los dos ciclos de tratamiento. No encontramos diferencias estadísticas en el cambio de vegetación y pocas diferencias en los cambios de densidades de aves entre pastizales. Sin embargo, la revisión de las medias de los pastizales sugiere que los cambios en el vigor de los arbustos y el patrón espacial fueron diferentes entre pastizales con y sin pastoreo, y que los cambios en la densidad poblacional de tres de las nueve especies de aves y tres de los gremios estudiados difieren entre pastizales. Nuestros resultados sugieren que los hábitats para aves sensibles al pastoreo pueden ser reestablecidos aun permitiendo el pastoreo tardío, aunque la tasa de recuperación de especies será más lenta si todo el ganado es removido.

Ancillary