Get access

Extinction and Spatial Structure in Simulation Models

Authors

  • Kerstin Wiegand,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Ecological Modelling , Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig-Halle, Permoserstrasse 15, UFZ, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany
      #Current address: Department of Agriculture and Environmental Management, IFZ, Justus-Liebig-University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, D-35392 Giessen, Germany, email kerstin.wiegand@agrar.uni-giessen.de
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Klaus Henle,

    1. Department of Biology and Natural Resources, Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig-Halle, Permoserstrasse 15, UFZ, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stephen D. Sarre

    1. Ecology Group, Institute of Natural Resources, Massey University, P.O. Box 11222, Palmerston North,
      New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author

#Current address: Department of Agriculture and Environmental Management, IFZ, Justus-Liebig-University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, D-35392 Giessen, Germany, email kerstin.wiegand@agrar.uni-giessen.de

Abstract

Abstract: Aspects of within-population spatial structure are often neglected in the modeling of population viability. To analyze the relevance of the spatial structure of single populations to population persistence, we compared the results of three models developed for the territorial, arboreal gecko Oedura reticulata: (1) a spatially structured model in which both low and high densities incur mortality costs due to increased movement, (2) a spatially structured model in which the Allee effect is removed, and (3) a spatially unstructured model in which there are no effects of density on mortality. Compared with nonspatial model populations, spatially structured populations exhibited reduced persistence. The Allee effect contributed only a small amount to the reduction in persistence. Increased mortality at high densities caused by difficulties in finding territories markedly reduced persistence in the spatially structured models compared with the density-independent nonspatial model. We argue that the inclusion of elements of spatial structure may considerably influence the estimation of extinction risk in population viability analyses.

Abstract

Resumen: Los aspectos de la estructura espacial dentro de una población son frecuentemente ignorados en el modelado de viabilidad poblacional. Para analizar la importancia de la estructura espacial de poblaciones individuales en la persistencia de una población, comparamos los resultados de tres modelos desarrollados para un gecko arbóreo territorial, Oedura reticulata: (1) un modelo estructurado espacialmente en el cual tanto las densidades bajas como altas incurren en costos de mortalidad debido a un incremento en el movimiento, (2) un modelo estructurado espacialmente en el cual el efecto Allee es removido y (3) un modelo estructurado espacialmente en el cual no hay efectos de la densidad sobre la mortalidad. Comparados con modelos de poblaciones no espaciales, las poblaciones estructuradas espacialmente exhibieron una persistencia reducida. El efecto Allee contribuyóúnicamente con una pequeña proporción de la reducción en la persistencia. El incremento en mortalidad a elevadas densidades debido a la dificultad en encontrar territorios, disminuyó marcadamente la persistencia en los modelos estructurados espacialmente en comparación con los modelos no espaciales, denso-independientes. Argumentamos que la inclusión de los elementos de la estructura espacial puede influenciar considerablemente la estimación de los riesgos de extinción en los análisis de viabilidad poblaciones.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary