Pregnancy Outcome After Previous Stillbirth Resulting from Causes Other Than Maternal Conditions and Fetal Abnormalities

Authors

  • Seppo Heinonen MD, PhD,

    1. Seppo Heinonen is a Research Fellow and Pertti Kirkinen is Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
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  • Pertti Kirkinen MD, PhD

    1. Seppo Heinonen is a Research Fellow and Pertti Kirkinen is Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
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Address correspondence to Seppo Heinonen, MD, PhD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kuopio University Hospital, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.

Abstract

Background:An adequate fetomaternal circulatory system may be compromised by a variety of disturbances leading to stillbirth. The purpose of this study was to assess subsequent pregnancy outcome in women with a history of stillbirth as a result of causes other than maternal conditions and fetal abnormalities.Methods:Ninety-two deliveries after stillbirth were identified among 11,910 deliveries of parous women recorded in the birth registry at Kuopio, Finland. Using logistic regression, pregnancy outcome measures were compared with those of a parous healthy obstetric population (n= 11,818).Results:Women with a history of stillbirth as a result of causes other than maternal conditions and fetal abnormalities were older than their unaffected controls (32.4 yr vs 30.3 yr). Stillbirth in an earlier pregnancy was associated with a significantly higher (p < 0.001) frequency of placental abruption in subsequent pregnancy (5.4% vs 0.7%). A history of stillbirth was predictive of preterm delivery (OR = 2.25) and low-birthweight infants (OR = 2.70). No recurrence was reported.Conclusions:Pregnancy with a history of stillbirth as a result of causes other than maternal conditions and fetal abnormalities is a moderate risk state, with prematurity and low-birthweight rates somewhat higher than those in the general population. The overall probability of a favorable outcome is good. These findings may be useful in counseling pregnant women with a history of stillbirth.

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