Rejuvenation of Photoaged Skin: 5 Years Results with Intense Pulsed Light of the Face, Neck, and Chest

Authors


  • THIS STUDY WAS PRESENTED IN PART AT THE 2000 ASDS ANNUAL MEETING IN DENVER. THE AUTHORS ARE CONSULTANTS AND PRECEPTORS FOR LUMENIS. THE DEVICES USED IN THIS STUDY WERE PURCHASED AT A DISCOUNT. NO DIRECT FUNDING WAS PROVIDED FOR THIS STUDY.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Robert A. Weiss, MD, Maryland Laser, Skin & Vein Institute, 54 Scott Adam Road, Hunt Valley, MD 21209, or e-mail: rwderm@earthlink.net.

Abstract

background. Photorejuvenation involves the use of lasers or light sources to reverse signs of photoaging. Multiple devices have been shown to be effective over the short-term.

objective. To investigate the long-term clinical results on the face, neck and chest at 4 years using filtered flashlamp intense pulsed light (IPL) for treatment of photoaging changes of telangiectasias, dyspigmentation, and rough skin texture.

methods. A chart review of 80 randomly selected patients with skin types I-IV who were treated by IPL during 1996 and 1997 was performed. Photos and patient self-assessment were graded for features of textural smoothness, telangiectasia severity, and blotchy pigmentation into four categories of worse, no change, slightly better (less than 50% improvement) and much better (greater than 50% improvement).

results. At 4 years following initial treatment, skin textural improvement was noted in 83% of the subjects. Telangiectasias were improved in 82% of subjects, while pigmentation remained improved in 79%. The median number of treatments was 3. The face responded slightly better than the chest or neck. Most common side-effects included temporary mild crusting (19%), erythema (15%) and purpura (6%).

conclusion. Signs of photoaging including telangiectasias and mottled pigmentation of the face, neck, and chest, can be improved by IPL with a long-lasting result. Minimal or no downtime with minimal adverse effects can be achieved with the settings reported. Skin textural smoothing, although not easily quantified, is an additional benefit observed long-term.

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