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Keywords:

  • breast pathology;
  • education;
  • standardization;
  • training

Abstract: Pathology is the study of human illness and it involves the morphologic and biologic recognition of abnormalities that are associated with a disease. Breast pathology represents an excellent example of this discipline. By providing diagnostic information and by characterizing the biologic behavior of a breast lesion, a pathologist plays a critical role in a patient's life. Any mistake in this exercise is associated with serious consequences. In addition, there are many unresolved issues in breast pathology, which contribute to our limited understanding of the biology of breast cancer, variability in diagnostic criteria, and significant diversity in breast cancer management and therapy. Furthermore, breast pathology has remained an underrecognized discipline, and its importance in diagnosis and disease management is not fully realized. In order to better serve our patients, particularly medically underserved women and those living in countries with limited resources, we must place emphasis on effectively using the talent and expertise of pathologists around the globe. For example, to provide a cost-effective way to diagnose breast cancer, particularly at advanced stages, pathologists can sample lesions by fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), stain the resulting smears, and provide an immediate bedside diagnosis. This is a valid contribution; however, this exercise requires the availability of a pathologist with experience in breast cytopathology. Alternatively the pathologist may seek consultations from more experienced pathologists. Developing strategies to better recognize the importance of high-quality breast pathology services and to train qualified and innovative breast pathologists is an ambitious task. The proposed Worldwide Excellence in Breast Pathology Program may provide such an opportunity.