Randomized trial of four-layer and two-layer bandage systems in the management of chronic venous ulceration

Authors


Reprint requests: Professor Peter J. Franks, Centre for Research & Implementation of Clinical Practice, Thames Valley University, 32–38 Uxbridge Road, London W5 2BS, United Kingdom. Fax: (44) 20 8280 5285; Email: peter.franks@tvu.ac.uk.

Abstract

To compare a four-layer bandage system with a two-layer system in the management of chronic venous leg ulceration, a prospective randomized open parallel groups trial was undertaken. In total, 112 patients newly presenting to leg ulcer services with chronic leg ulceration, screened to exclude the presence of arterial disease (ankle brachial pressure index <0.8) and causes of ulceration other than venous disease, were entered into the trial. Patients were randomized to receive either four-layer (Profore™) or two-layer (Surepress™) high-compression elastic bandage systems. In all, 109 out of 112 patients had at least one follow-up. After 24 weeks, 50 out of 57 (88%) patients randomized to the four-layer bandage system with follow-up had ulcer closure (full epithelialization) compared with 40 out of 52 (77%) on the two-layer bandage, hazard ratio = 1.18 (95% confidence interval 0.69–2.02), p = 0.55. After 12 weeks, 40 out of 57 (70%) patients randomized to the four-layer bandage system with follow-up had ulcer closure compared with 30 out of 52 (58%) on the two-layer bandage, odds ratio = 4.23 (95% confidence interval 1.29–13.86), p = 0.02. Withdrawal rates were significantly greater on the two-layer bandage (30 out of 54; 56%) compared with the four-layer bandage system (8 out of 58; 14%), p < 0.001, and the number of patients with at least one device-related adverse incident was significantly greater on the two-layer bandaging system (15 out of 54; 28%) compared with four-layer bandaging (5 out of 54; 9%), p = 0.01. The higher mean cost of treatment in the two-layer bandaging system arm over 24 weeks ($1374 [£916] vs. $1314 [£876]) was explained by the increased mean number of bandage changes (1.5 vs. 1.1 per week) with the two-layer system. In conclusion, the four-layer bandage offers advantages over the two-layer bandage in terms of reduced withdrawal from treatment, fewer adverse incidents, and lower treatment cost. (WOUND REP REG 2003;11:166–171)

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