The Client Encounter Form: Conceptual Development, Reliability Analysis, and Clinical Applications

Authors

  • Mary Bear Ph.D., R.N.,

    1. Mary Bear is an Associate Professor and Gerontology Research Coordinator at the School of Nursing, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. Lygia Holcomb is an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lygia Holcomb D.S.N., R.N., ARNP

    1. Mary Bear is an Associate Professor and Gerontology Research Coordinator at the School of Nursing, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida. Lygia Holcomb is an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address Correspondence to Mary Bear, 3810 Kinsley Place, Winter Park, FL 32792. E-mail: mbear@pegasus.cc.ucf.edu

Abstract

This descriptive correlational study investigated the reliability of a new measure of client-nurse practitioner interaction, the Client Encounter Form (CEF), and used the CEF to describe the domains of client-nurse practitioner interaction that occurred during problem and preventative visits at a primary care clinic. The CEF is based on Cox's Interactional Model of Client Health Behavior. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 41 primary care clinic visits. Descriptive data on all clients and the patterns of use characterized by the CEF were collected using retrospective chart review (n= 60). Reliability testing showed the CEF has high interrater reliability; Cohen's Kappas for its dimensions ranged from 0.78–1.0. The CEF was also shown to be useable in a primary care clinic. Health information, affective support, goal setting, and technical procedures were consistently part of the nurse-client interactions in this sample, demonstrating they are part of the nurse practitioner model of care. Analysis revealed different patterns of interaction for preventative and problem-oriented visits. Preventative visits had higher levels of health promotion information, psychological affective support, and health promotion goal-setting behaviors. Problem visits included more information regarding the client's diagnosis, medications, and treatments, and more affective support related to the client's physical condition.

Ancillary