The Effects of Community Health Nurse Monitoring on Hypertension Identification and Control

Authors

  • Mary Jo Clark Ph.D., R.N.,

    1. Mary Jo Clark is an Associate Dean and Professor, Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, University of San Diego, San Diego, California. Constance Curran is a Public Health Nurse, Community Outreach Partnership Center, San Diego, California. Ariko Noji is Professor and Chair, Community Health Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan.
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  • Constance Curran M.S.N., P.H.N.,

    1. Mary Jo Clark is an Associate Dean and Professor, Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, University of San Diego, San Diego, California. Constance Curran is a Public Health Nurse, Community Outreach Partnership Center, San Diego, California. Ariko Noji is Professor and Chair, Community Health Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan.
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  • Ariko Noji Ph.D., R.N.

    1. Mary Jo Clark is an Associate Dean and Professor, Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, University of San Diego, San Diego, California. Constance Curran is a Public Health Nurse, Community Outreach Partnership Center, San Diego, California. Ariko Noji is Professor and Chair, Community Health Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan.
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Address correspondence to Mary Jo Clark, Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, University of San Diego, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA 92110. E-mail: clark@acusd.edu

Abstract

Identification and control of hypertension are important public health concerns. Lack of regular health care makes diagnosis and control difficult in some populations. Community health nursing services in settings where clients regularly congregate promote identification and control of hypertension.

This study focused on the effects of community health nursing screening and monitoring services for hypertension provided to participants in a breadline, a senior nutrition program, an English as Second Language (ESL) class, and employees providing these services. Community health nurses (CHNs) provided 2,407 blood pressure-related service encounters. Blood pressures were elevated in 19% of encounters, and 10% of clients had elevations that warranted referral for medical assistance. At the end of the 18-month study period, 67% of all clients with elevations and 71% of those referred for medical assistance had achieved normal blood pressures. One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant relationship between the number of encounters with the nurses and a positive outcome for all clients with elevations. This relationship was not supported for those clients referred to medical assistance.

The effectiveness of intervention appeared to vary somewhat among subgroups with some groups more likely than others to achieve a positive outcome. Group differences in outcome were not statistically significant.

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