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Attitudes, Subjective Norm, Perceived Behavioral Control, and Intentions Related to Adult Smoking Cessation After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

Authors

  • Mary Bursey R.N., M.Sc.,

    1. Mary Bursey is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Riverdale Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dorothy Craig is a Professor, University of Toronto, Faculty of Nursing, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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  • Dorothy Craig R.N., M.Sc.N.

    1. Mary Bursey is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Riverdale Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dorothy Craig is a Professor, University of Toronto, Faculty of Nursing, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence to Mary Bursey, The Riverdale Hospital, 14 St. Matthews Road, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4M 2B5.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between intention, attitudes, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control related to smoking cessation in adults after initial coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). The theoretical framework for the study was derived from Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior. Intention, the global and belief-based measures of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control were measured with the Determinants of Adult Smoking Cessation (DOASC) Questionnaire developed by the investigator. Thirty-two adult smokers completed the questionnaire 2 to 3 weeks following hospital discharge. Four weeks after the questionnaire completion, a follow-up telephone call was used to determine the participants' current smoking status. The study results indicated that there was a statistically significant relationship between the intention to quit smoking after CABG and the global measure of attitude, and perceived behavioral control. This study highlights some of the beliefs about the outcomes of quitting smoking permanently after CABG which may underlie attitudes, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control in this population. Implications for theory, practice, and research are discussed.

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