Prevention of Smoking Behaviors in Middle School Students: Student Nurse Interventions

Authors

  • Marilyn P. Miller Ph.D., R.N.,

    1. Marilyn P. Miller is an Assistant Professor, Jackie Gillespie is an Instructor, and Susan Davel is a Former Student, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Ann Billian is a Staff Nurse, Peace Corps, Nepal.
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  • Jackie Gillespie M.S.N., R.N.,

    1. Marilyn P. Miller is an Assistant Professor, Jackie Gillespie is an Instructor, and Susan Davel is a Former Student, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Ann Billian is a Staff Nurse, Peace Corps, Nepal.
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  • Ann Billian B.S.N.,

    1. Marilyn P. Miller is an Assistant Professor, Jackie Gillespie is an Instructor, and Susan Davel is a Former Student, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Ann Billian is a Staff Nurse, Peace Corps, Nepal.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susan Davel B.S.N.

    1. Marilyn P. Miller is an Assistant Professor, Jackie Gillespie is an Instructor, and Susan Davel is a Former Student, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Ann Billian is a Staff Nurse, Peace Corps, Nepal.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence to Marilyn P. Miller, Clemson University, 516 Edwards Hall, Clemson, SC 29634. E-mail: marilyn@clemson.edu

Abstract

This article examines the use of the Tar Wars curriculum with the public health problem of preteen smoking and outlines interventions with a middle school population by community health student nurses from a state university. Smoking is the single most preventable cause of death and disability. Three million people die worldwide each year as a result of smoking. Cigarette smoking has now been labeled a pediatric disease. Estimates are that 3,000 children will begin a lifelong addiction to cigarettes every day. They will face a life of poor quality based on the medical consequences of smoking cigarettes. Mortality from tobacco use is annually greater than that from drug abuse, AIDS, suicide, homicide, and motor vehicle accidents combined. Preteen and teenage smoking is now a public health problem, therefore implications for service learning, nursing advocacy, and interventions with this health problem are discussed.

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