Antecedents of Adherence to Antituberculosis Therapy

Authors

  • Marcia McDonnell D.S.N., R.N.C., F.N.P.,

    1. Marcia McDonnell is an Assistant Professor (Clinical), Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Joan Turn is a Professor, and Michael T. Weaver is a Professor, School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
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  • Joan Turner D.S.N., R.N.,

    1. Marcia McDonnell is an Assistant Professor (Clinical), Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Joan Turn is a Professor, and Michael T. Weaver is a Professor, School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
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  • Michael T. Weaver R.N., Ph.D., FAAN

    1. Marcia McDonnell is an Assistant Professor (Clinical), Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Joan Turn is a Professor, and Michael T. Weaver is a Professor, School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
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Address correspondence to Marcia McDonnell, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: nurmmcd@nurse.emory.edu

Abstract

This correlational study identified antecedents of adherence to antituberculosis (anti-TB) therapy in a convenience sample of 62 English-speaking adults. From a demographic perspective, the study sample was similar to the referent population of TB patients in Georgia. A variety of parametric analyses revealed the following: The mean self-reported adherence score was 92.6% (SD= 3.3). Higher levels of self-reported adherence were associated with an annual income of $11,000 or more, education beyond high school, no current alcohol use, perceived support and absence of barriers to medication taking, strong intentions to adhere, and a high capacity for self-care. Those six variables accounted for 28% of adherence variance, F(6, 44) of 4.3, p= 0.0017. Additionally, belief in the usefulness and benefit of the medications was strongly correlated with intentions to adhere (r= 0.83, p < 0.001), and interpersonal aspects of care was significantly correlated with perceptions of medication utility (r= 0.65, p < 0.001), supports/barriers (r= 0.44, p < 0.001), intentions (r= 0.69, p < 0.001), and self-care (r=–0.42, p < 0.01). Persons who were diagnosed with both TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reported significantly lower adherence.

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