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The Impact of a Stroke Screening Program

Authors

  • Deborah F. Willoughby Ph.D., R.N., C.S.,

    1. Deborah F. Willoughby is an Associate Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Leigh Sanders is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Anderson Area Medical Center. Arlene Privette is an Associate Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina.
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  • Leigh Sanders M.S., R.N.,

    1. Deborah F. Willoughby is an Associate Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Leigh Sanders is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Anderson Area Medical Center. Arlene Privette is an Associate Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Arlene Privette Ph.D., R.N.

    1. Deborah F. Willoughby is an Associate Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. Leigh Sanders is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Anderson Area Medical Center. Arlene Privette is an Associate Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina.
    Search for more papers by this author

Address correspondence to Deborah F. Willoughby, 512 Edwards Hall, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634. E-mail: willoud@clemson.edu

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of serious disability and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Prevention and early intervention are key to reducing death and disability from stroke. This study investigated the impact of a community-based stroke-screening program on the knowledge of participants regarding signs and symptoms of stroke, related emergency action, and personal risk factors for stroke. Self-reported behavioral changes were also recorded. Initial data were collected at the screening site as part of the program, and follow-up data were collected by telephone interview at 1, 3, and 6-month intervals after the screening. Of the 107 people who participated in the screening, 85 (79%) participated in all three follow-up interviews. Findings indicate that participants in this community-based stroke-screening program showed increases in their knowledge about stroke, including what a stroke is, signs and symptoms, related emergency action, personal risk factors, and ways to reduce risk. Furthermore, the findings demonstrate that the knowledge was retained throughout the study period. Approximately half of the participants also reported having made at least one behavioral change to reduce their stroke risk.

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