A Win–Win Model for an Academic Nursing Center: Community Partnership Faculty Practice

Authors

  • Stella Shiber Ph.D., R.N., C.S.,

    1. Associate Dean, Professional Education Programs and Practice, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland.,
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  • Marion D'Lugoff M.A., R.N., C.S.

    1. Associate Dean, Professional Education Programs and Practice, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland.,
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Stella Shiber Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, 525 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205. E-mail: sshiber@son.jhmi.edu

Abstract

A number of schools of nursing have established community nursing centers to provide faculty practice sites, student learning experiences, and a service to the community, most often to a poor underserved population. The current literature concludes that these centers provide a quality clinical service and improve access to health care, and they also provide an avenue for research, training, and faculty practice. Acquiring necessary financial support and the ability to achieve financial independence appear to be the most common difficulties for these centers. Most of the current literature includes an examination of issues relating to funding. The model presented in this article focuses on organizational variables that include both the center and its placement in relationship to other functions and programs in the school and a broadening of the meaning of fiscal responsibility to include an awareness of the broad spectrum of benefits that the community nursing center brings to the entire school. Efforts to coordinate and integrate the needs and functions of several groups are described. Establishing goals and priorities that simultaneously meet the needs of all or most of these groups has been an important outcome. The activities of the center have become an integral part of the everyday life of the school. Achieving financial independence and being fiscally aware and responsible is not the same thing.

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