Interventions to Promote Physical Activity Among African American Women

Authors

  • JoAnne Banks-Wallace,

    1. Joanne Banks-Wallace is an Assistant Professor of Nursing and Women's Studies and Vicki Conn is the Director of Research and a Professor of Nursing in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri–Columbia, Columbia, Missouri.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Vicki Conn

    1. Joanne Banks-Wallace is an Assistant Professor of Nursing and Women's Studies and Vicki Conn is the Director of Research and a Professor of Nursing in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri–Columbia, Columbia, Missouri.
    Search for more papers by this author

  Joanne Banks-Wallace, R.N., Ph.D., MU Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri–Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211. E-mail: banks-wallacej@health.missouri.edu

Abstract

The lack of routine physical activity among African American women places them at risk for negative health outcomes associated with inactivity. The number of studies focused on African American women has increased dramatically in the past decade. This review examined the intervention research literature testing strategies to increase activity among African American women. Eighteen studies with 1,623 subjects were retrieved. Diverse interventions, settings, and measures were reported. Common methodologic weaknesses included lack of randomization of subjects, single-group design, instruments without documented validity and reliability, significant attrition, and questionable timing of outcome variable measurement. Strategies to design and deliver culturally appropriate interventions are reviewed. Suggestions for future research, such as examining intragroup differences and communal resources, are provided.

Ancillary