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Scarring Resulting from Chickenpox

Authors

  • Alexander K. C. Leung M.B.B.S., F.R.C.P.C., F.R.C.P. (UK & Irel), F.R.C.P.C.H.,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary and Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • C. Pion Kao M.D., F.R.C.P.C.,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary and Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Reginald S. Sauve M.D., F.R.C.P.C.

    1. Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary and Alberta Children’s Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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Alexander K. C. Leung M.B.B.S. Alberta Children’s Hospital, 1820 Richmond Rd. SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2T 5C7.

Abstract

Nine hundred and eighty-six children (519 boys, 467 girls) who had chickenpox at least 1 year previously were examined for the presence of scars resulting from this disease. Ninety-six (18.5%) boys and 88 (18.8%) girls had chickenpox scars, giving rise to an overall prevalence of 18.7%. The scars were found on the face in 75 (40.8%), neck 2 (1.1%), shoulders 8 (4.3%), upper limbs 15 (8.2%), anterior thorax 50 (27.2%), abdomen 106 (57.6%), back 65 (35.3%), buttocks 9 (4.9%), and lower limbs 12 (6.5%) affected children. The mean number of scars in the 184 children was 2.8 (standard deviation 1.9). The scars were hyperpigmented in 32, hypopigmented in 160, depressed in 38, and hypertrophic in 32 children. Keloids were noted in two children.

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