The Influence of Knowledge and Attitudes About Breast Cancer on Mammography Use Among Latinas and Anglo Women

Authors

  • F. Allan Hubbell MD, MSPH,

    1. Center for Health Policy and Research, University of California, Irvine,
    2. Departments of Medicine, University of California, Irvine,
    3. School of Social Ecology, University of California, Irvine,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shiraz I. Mishra MD, PhD,

    1. Center for Health Policy and Research, University of California, Irvine,
    2. Departments of Medicine, University of California, Irvine,
    3. School of Social Ecology, University of California, Irvine,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Leo R. Chavez PhD,

    1. Center for Health Policy and Research, University of California, Irvine,
    2. Anthropology, University of California, Irvine,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • R. Burciaga Valdez PhD,

    1. School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, and the Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, Calif.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Mhsa

    1. Center for Health Policy and Research, University of California, Irvine,
    Search for more papers by this author

Dr. Hubbell : Health Policy and Research, 3225 Berkeley Place, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-5800.

Abstract

We conducted a telephone survey of randomly selected Latinas (n= 208) and Anglo women (n= 222) to determine predictors of mammography use. The cooperation rate was 78.5%. Relatively high proportions of Latinas (61%) and Anglo women (79%) reported mammography use within the past 2 years. A logistic regression analysis revealed that knowledge and attitudes did not independently predict use. On the other hand, having health insurance, being married, and being Latino were consistent independent predictors. We conclude that mammography use among Latinas and Anglo women is increasing. However, further gains in use must address difficult barriers such as lack of health insurance.

KEY WORDS: Latinos/Hispanics; mammography; breast cancer.

Ancillary