Ambulatory Morning Report

Can It Prepare Residents for the American Board of Internal Medicine Examination?

Authors


Address correspondence and requests for reprints to Dr. Wenderoth: Cornell Internal Medicine Associates, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 505 East 70th St., HT-4, New York, NY 10021 (e-mail: swendero@med.cornell.edu).

Abstract

We assessed the ability of a novel ambulatory morning report format to expose internal medicine residents to the breadth of topics covered by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) exam. Cases were selected by the Ambulatory Assistant Chief Residents and recorded in a logbook to limit duplication. We conducted a retrospective review of 406 cases discussed from July 1998 to July 2000 and cataloged each according to the primary content area. The percentage of cases in each area accurately reflected that covered by the ABIM exam, with little redundancy or over-selection of esoteric diseases. Our data suggest that a general medicine clinic is capable of exposing house staff to the wide breadth of internal medicine topics previously thought to be unique to subspecialty clinics.

Ancillary