A Cross-sectional Descriptive Study of Mentoring Relationships Formed by Medical Students

Authors

  • Eva M. Aagaard MD,

    1. Received from the Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, The University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif.
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  • Karen E. Hauer MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Received from the Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, The University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif.
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  • Presented in part at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting, May 2000, Boston, Mass; and the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine Annual Meeting, October 2000, Washington D.C.

Address correspondence and requests for reprints to Dr. Hauer: Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 400 Parnassus Ave., Box 0320, San Francisco, CA 94143-0320 (e-mail: karenha@itsa.ucsf.edu).

Abstract

To describe medical students' mentoring relationships and determine characteristics associated with having mentors, 232/302 (77%) of third- and fourth-year medical students at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) were surveyed. Twenty-six percent of third-year and 45% of fourth-year students had mentors. Most met their mentors during inpatient clerkships (28%), research (19%), or sought them on the basis of similar interests (23%). On multivariate analysis, students who performed research prior to (odds ratio [OR], 4.8; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 16.7; P = .01) or during medical school (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1 to 5.6; P = .03) and students satisfied with advising from all sources at UCSF (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.4 to 2.4; P < .001) were more likely to have mentors.

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