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Keywords:

  • SUNCT;
  • trigeminal neuralgia;
  • cluster headache;
  • idiopathic stabbing headache;
  • jabs and jobs syndrome;
  • short-lasting headaches

New clinical features of the SUNCT syndrome are described in a series of 3 men (mean age of 65 years, range 56 to 80). The mean age at the onset of symptoms was 55 years (range 39 to 77). Although in all patients the great majority of attacks were typical, on a few occasions unusual features of the painful attacks were either reported or witnessed by the investigators. We have classified these clinical phenomena as (1) low-grade background pain or discomfort, and (2) relatively Long-lasting attacks.

Neither neurological examination nor neuroimaging studies revealed structural lesions as responsible for the atypical features. The fact that these atypical attacks occurred in the usual symptomatic area and were accompanied by the usual ipsilateral autonomic signs, suggests that they are an integral part of the clinical picture of SUNCT. The possibility that another, concurrent headache was responsible for the unusual attacks is considered unlikely. These clinical phenomena should, accordingly, provisionally be considered as additional but rare clinical features of the SUNCT syndrome.