Catecholaminergic Innervation of the Human Dura Mater Involved in Headache

Authors

  • Daniela Cavallotti MD,

    1. From II Neurological Clinic University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy (Dr. Daniela Cavallotti),
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  • Marco Artico MD, PharmD,

    1. Chair of Human Anatomy of the Faculty of Pharmacy University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy (Drs. Artico and De Santis),
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  • Stefano De Santis MD,

    1. Chair of Human Anatomy of the Faculty of Pharmacy University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy (Drs. Artico and De Santis),
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  • Giandomenico Iannetti MSc,

    1. and the Department of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Sciences Section of Anatomy (Mr. Iannetti and Prof. Carlo Cavallotti), University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy.
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  • Carlo Cavallotti MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. and the Department of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Sciences Section of Anatomy (Mr. Iannetti and Prof. Carlo Cavallotti), University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy.
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Address all correspondence to Prof. Carlo Cavallotti, Dipartimento di Scienze Cardlovascolari e Respiratorie, Sezione di Anatomia, via A. Borelli 50,00161 Roma, Italy.

Abstract

The catecholaminergic innervation of cranial dura mater in humans was studied by examining several dural zones (vascular, perivascular, intervascular) in different regions (basal, calvarial, occipital, frontal, tentorial, parietal, temporal).

The results demonstrate that catecholaminergic nerve fibers are present in human cranial dura mater and that these fibers, after exposure to formaldehyde vapors, show the specific fluorescence of catecholamines.

There are more dural catecholaminergic nerve fibers in the basal region than in the calvarial region. Moreover, these nerve fibers are more abundant in the perivascular dural zone than in the intervascular zone.

We hypothesize that these catecholaminergic nerve fibers may be involved in headache.

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