Use of Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (PENS) for Treating ECT-Induced Headaches

Authors

  • El-sayed A. Ghoname MD,

    1. From the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.
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  • William F. Craig MD,

    1. From the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.
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  • Paul F. White PhD, MD

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.
      Address all correspondence to Dr. Paul F. White, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5161 Harry Hines Boulevard, Suite CS2.202, Dallas, TX 75235-9068.
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Address all correspondence to Dr. Paul F. White, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5161 Harry Hines Boulevard, Suite CS2.202, Dallas, TX 75235-9068.

Abstract

Five patients who experienced migrainelike attacks associated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) were treated using a novel nonpharmacologic therapy known as percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS). In this sham-controlled preliminary evaluation, PENS therapy proved to be a useful alternative to opioid analgesics for the acute treatment and/or prevention of ECT-induced headache.

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