High-Velocity Resistance Training Increases Skeletal Muscle Peak Power in Older Women

Authors

  • Roger A. Fielding PhD,

    1. Human Physiology Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts;
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  • Nathan K. LeBrasseur MSPT,

    1. Human Physiology Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts;
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  • Anthony Cuoco MS,

    1. Human Physiology Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts;
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  • Jonathan Bean MD, MS,

    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and
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  • Kelly Mizer BS,

    1. Human Physiology Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts;
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  • Maria A. Fiatarone Singh MD

    1. School of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
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Address correspondence to Roger A. Fielding, PhD, Human Physiology Laboratory, Department of Health Sciences, Boston University, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215. E-mail: fielding@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Peak power declines more precipitously than strength with advancing age and is a reliable measure of impairment and a strong predictor of functional performance. We tested the hypothesis that a high-velocity resistance-training program (HI) would increase muscle power more than a traditional low-velocity resistance-training program (LO).

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