Factors Influencing the Use of Computer Technology in the Collection of Clinical Data in a Predominantly African-American Population

Authors

  • Anna Maria Izquierdo-Porrera MD,

    1. Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD
    2. Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Maryland Veterans Affairs Health Care System at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD.
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  • Roopak Manchanda MS,

    1. Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD
    2. Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Maryland Veterans Affairs Health Care System at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD.
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  • Claudia C. Powell MS,

    1. Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD
    2. Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Maryland Veterans Affairs Health Care System at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD.
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  • John D. Sorkin MD, PhD,

    1. Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD
    2. Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Maryland Veterans Affairs Health Care System at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD.
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  • Douglas D. Bradham DrPH

    1. Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD
    2. Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Maryland Veterans Affairs Health Care System at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD.
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Address correspondence to John Sorkin, MD, PhD, VAMC Geriatrics BT/18/GR, 10 N Greene Street, Baltimore, MD, 21201. E-mail: john@grecc.umaryland.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the cognitive and demographic factors that affect the performance of a predominantly African-American population in the use of a computerized version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D).

DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

SETTING: University Medical Center and Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland.

PARTICIPANTS: Forty-three healthy community-dwelling adults from a predominantly African-American Apostolic church; mean age ± standard deviation 57 ± 14 (range 29–83).

MEASUREMENTS: Cognitive measurements (Mini-Mental State Examination, digits span, word list learning, letter number sequencing, executive interview, and clock-drawing task), education level, computer experience, and age. The CES-D was administered on three occasions: a paper form CES-D once and a computerized version twice. Time to completion the computer CES-D (Time 1), differential in time to completion of both computer tests (delta-time) and scores of the CES-D with both forms of administration were recorded.

RESULTS: There was no difference between the scores from the paper and the computer CES-D or between the two computer forms. Computer experience predicted Time 1 (partial correlation R = 15%, P = .017) and delta-time (partial correlation R = 10%, P = .048). Age, education, and cognitive function did not affect performance.

CONCLUSION: Computerized assessment techniques are valid and unaffected by age, education level, or cognitive factors in healthy individuals.

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