Characterization of reactions after transfusion of cellular blood components that are white cell reduced before storage

Authors

  • I. Federowicz,

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    • 1

      Irena Federowicz, MD, PhD, Associate Attending Physician, Department of Radiotherapy, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland; Research Associate, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA.

  • B. B. Barrett,

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      Barbara B. Barrett, MT(ASCP)SBB, Technical Director, Blood Component Laboratory, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

  • J. W. Andersen,

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      Janet W. Andersen, MS, Statistician, Division of Biostatistics, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

  • M. Urashima,

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      Mitsuyoshi Urashima, MD, PhD, Research Associate, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

  • M. A. Popovsky,

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      Mark A. Popovsky, MD, Director, American Red Cross Blood Services, Northeast Region, Dedham, MA.

  • K. C. Anderson MD

    Associate Professor, Corresponding authorSearch for more papers by this author

6Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and Medical Director, Blood Component Laboratory and Divisions of Medical Oncology and of Hematologic Malignancies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115.

Abstract

Background: During the storage of cellular components before transfusion, cytokines that may mediate transfusion reactions are released from white cells (WBCs). Adverse effects of transfused cellular blood components therefore depend not only on the number of residual WBCs in blood components, but also on the timing of WBC reduction.

Study Design and Methods: Febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), allergic reactions, and other reactions were characterized in recipients of 4728 units of red cells (RBCs) and 3405 bags of single-donor apheresis platelets (SDAPs), all of which underwent prestorage WBC reduction. To delineate the impact of prestorage versus poststorage WBC reduction of RBCs on transfusion reactions, these results were compared with reactions occurring after the transfusion to similar recipients of 6447 bags of RBCs that underwent poststorage WBC reduction by bedside filtration and 5197 units of SDAPs that underwent prestorage WBC reduction. The levels of interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were measured in a subset of 20 implicated cellular blood components at the time of transfusion reactions and correlated with the duration of storage before transfusion.

Results: The incidence of reactions was greater after transfusions of SDAPs (5.49%) than of RBCs (1.63%). The incidence of FNHTRs after transfusion of RBCs that were WBC reduced before storage (1.1%) was significantly lower (p = 0.0045) than that after transfusion of RBCs that were WBC reduced after storage (2.15%). Although allergic reactions to RBCs that were WBC reduced before storage were also less common (0.41%) than those to RBCs that were WBC reduced after storage (0.51%), the difference was not significant (p = 0.067). At the time of reactions to RBCs and SDAPs that were reduced before storage, the level of IL-6 was negatively correlated (r = -0.54, p = 0.014) with the duration of storage before transfusion, and there was no correlation between the level of either IL-1 beta or IL-8 and the interval before transfusion. TNF-alpha was not detectable in any implicated component.

Conclusion: FNHTRs, but not allergic reactions, were less common after transfusion of RBCs that were WBC reduced before storage than after the transfusion of those WBC reduced after storage at the bedside by filtration. The level of IL-6 in implicated cellular blood components that were WBC reduced before storage was inversely correlated with the length of storage before transfusion. Further studies are needed to determine whether the transfusion of cellular blood components that were WBC reduced before storage can both diminish the incidence of adverse reactions and improve outcome.

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