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A randomized trial of solvent/detergent-treated and standard fresh-frozen plasma in the coagulopathy of liver disease and liver transplantation

Authors

  • L.M. Williamson,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • C.A. Llewelyn,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • N.C. Fisher,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • J.P. Allain,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • M.C. Bellamy,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • T.P. Baglin,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • J. Freeman,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • J.R. Klinck,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • F.A. Ala,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • N. Smith,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • J. Neuberger,

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • T.G. Wreghitt

    1. From the Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Cambridge; Addenbrooke's Hospital; Cambridge Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory; and the National Blood Service, Cambridge, UK; the National Blood Service and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK; and St James's Hospital, Leeds, UK.
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  • Address reprint requests to: Lorna Williamson, MD, University of Cambridge Division of Transfusion Medicine, East Anglia Blood Centre, Long Road, Cambridge CB2 2PT, UK; e-mail: lorna.williamson@nbs.nhs.uk.

  • Supported in part by Octapharma AG (Vienna, Austria) and the National Blood Authority of England.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Virus inactivation of pooled fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) by the solvent/detergent (SD) method results in a loss of approximately 20 percent of factor VIII. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of SD-treated plasma in correcting the coagulopathy associated with liver disease and liver transplantation.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients with coagulation deficits due to liver disease, who required FFP for invasive procedures or liver transplantation, were randomly assigned to receive either FFP or SD-treated plasma. Patients were assessed for side effects, correction of coagulopathy over 24 hours, and seroconversion for viral markers 6 to 18 months after treatment.

RESULTS: In the liver disease group, equal correction of clotting factors and partial thromboplastin time was seen with FFP and SD-treated plasma, with a similar return to baseline values over 24 hours. There was greater correction of the International Normalised Ratio in patients receiving SD-treated plasma (p = 0.037), but this patient group had higher baseline values than recipients of FFP (p = 0.024). Liver transplant patients also showed equivalent correction of coagulopathy with the same dose of FFP and SD-treated plasma. The use of other blood components during transplantation was identical in the two treatment groups. No seroconversions were seen for HIV or hepatitis B or C virus. One patient who had received FFP seroconverted for human parvovirus B19. Apparent seroconversion for hepatitis A virus seen at 9 to 13 months in four other patients was probably due to detection of passively transferred antibodies, as later testing of these patients gave negative results. Minor side effects were rare in both groups.

CONCLUSION: SD-treated plasma is an efficacious source of coagulation factors for patients with liver disease who are undergoing biopsy or transplantation. Assessment of seroconversion for viral markers in recipients of plasma-derived products and plasma components should include consideration of the possibility that passively transferred antibodies were detected.

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