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Uncontrolled-rate freezing and storage at –80°C, with only3.5-percent DMSO in cryoprotective solution for 109 autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantations

Authors

  • Pascale Halle,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Olivier Tournilhac,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Wanda Knopinska-Posluszny,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Justyna Kanold,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Piotr Gembara,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Nathalie Boiret,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Chantal Rapatel,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Marc Berger,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Philippe Travade,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Stephan Angielski,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Jean Bonhomme,

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Francois Deméocq

    1. From the Bioclinical Unit of Cell Therapy and the Department of Pediatric Oncology (Pédiatrics B); the Department of Adult Clinical Hematology; and the Hematology Biology Laboratory, Hôtel Dieu Hospital, University Hospital Center, Clermont-Ferrand, France; and the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Academy, Gdansk, Poland.
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  • Supported in part by La Ligue Nationale contre le Cancer, Comité Départemental du Puy de Dôme, France.

Address reprint requests to: Pascal Halle, PhD, Unité Bioclinique de Thérapie Cellulaire, Service de Pédiatrie B, Hôtel Dieu, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, BP 69, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex, France; e-mail: phalle@chu-clermontferrand.fr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although controlled-rate freezing and storage in liquid nitrogen are the standard procedure for peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) cryopreserva-tion, uncontrolled-rate freezing and storage at –80°C have been reported.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The prospective evaluation of 109 autologous PBPC transplantations after uncontrolled-rate freezing and storage at –80°C of apheresis products is reported. The cryoprotectant solution contained final concentrations of 1-percent human serum albumin, 2.5-percent hydroxyethyl starch, and 3.5-percent DMSO.

RESULTS: With in vitro assays, the median recoveries of nucleated cells (NCs), CD34+ cells, CFU–GM, and BFU–E were 60.8 percent (range, 11.2-107.1%), 79.6 percent (6.3-158.1%), 35.6 percent (0.3-149.5%), and 32.6 percent (1.7-151.1%), respectively. The median length of storage was 7 weeks (range, 1-98). The median cell dose, per kg of body weight, given to patients after the preparative regimen was 6.34 × 108 NCs (range, 0.02-38.3), 3.77 × 106 CD34+ cells (0.23-58.5), and 66.04 × 104 CFU–GM (1.38-405.7). The median time to reach 0.5 × 109 granulocytes per L, 20 × 109 platelets per L, and 50 × 109 reticulocytes per L was 11 (range, 0-37), 11 (0-129), and 17 (0-200) days, respectively. Hematopoietic reconstitution did not differ in patients undergoing myeloablative or nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens before transplantation.

CONCLUSION: This simple and less expensive cryopreservation procedure can produce successful engraftment, comparable to that obtained with the standard storage procedure.

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