High-dose tamoxifen in the treatment of inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma: A multicenter randomized controlled trial

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Abstract

In the Asia-Pacific region and elsewhere, almost 85% of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are inoperable at diagnosis and have a dismal prognosis. Tamoxifen (TMX) is believed to inhibit HCC positive for estrogen receptor (ER), but most HCCs are ER negative. Results of previous phase 3 trials in inoperable HCC have been conflicting and inconclusive. At higher doses, however, TMX inhibits HCC through ER-independent mechanisms. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was performed to assess the role of high-dose TMX versus placebo (P) in the treatment of patients with inoperable HCC with respect to survival and quality of life (QoL). A total of 329 patients from 10 centers in 9 countries in the Asia-Pacific region enrolled in a double-blind randomized controlled trial of TMX 120 mg/d (TMX120) against P as a control arm with an intermediate dosage of TMX 60 mg/d (TMX60) to assess possible dose response. An independent data monitoring committee reviewed all aspects of the trial. QoL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Three-month survival rates for the P, TMX60, and TMX120 groups were 44%, 41%, and 35%, respectively, with a statistically significant trend difference in survival across the 3 treatment regimens (P = .011). There was a significantly higher risk of death in the TMX120 group compared with the P group (hazard ratio, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.81). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 3% (9 patients), and 8 patients were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, TMX does not prolong survival in patients with inoperable HCC and has an increasingly negative impact with increasing dose. No appreciable advantage to QoL with TMX was observed.

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