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Safe donor hepatectomy for living related liver transplantation

Authors

  • Yasuhiko Sugawara MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan
    • Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. Telephone: 81-3-3815-5411; FAX: 81-3-5684-3989
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  • Masatoshi Makuuchi,

    1. Department of Surgery, Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan
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  • Tadatoshi Takayama,

    1. Department of Surgery, Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan
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  • Hiroshi Imamura,

    1. Department of Surgery, Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan
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  • Junichi Kaneko,

    1. Department of Surgery, Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan
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  • Takao Ohkubo

    1. Department of Surgery, Artificial Organ and Transplantation Division, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract

Minimizing the risk of donor hepatectomy while preserving graft viability is an important concern in living related liver transplantation. This report describes clinical outcomes for living donor hepatectomy with reference to the type of hepatectomy. Donor hepatectomy was performed in 130 consecutive living donors. They were divided into three groups: left lateral or extended left lateral segmentectomy (group S; n = 50), left hepatectomy with or without caudate lobe or right lateral resection (group L; n = 64), and right hepatectomy (group R; n = 16). Intraoperative and postoperative data were examined and compared among the groups. No critical complications were observed in any group. However, there were differences in donor age, surgical and ischemia times, volume of blood loss, graft weight, and aspartate aminotransferase level elevation among the groups. Livers showed a substantial increase in volume, tending to the standard liver volume 1 month after surgery. Regardless of the extent of donor hepatectomy, serious complications did not occur after surgery. Surgical risk for a living donor is minimal if the operation is performed by experienced surgeons using present procedures.

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