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Sirolimus as primary immunosuppression in liver transplantation is not associated with hepatic artery or wound complications

Authors


Abstract

Sirolimus is a new immunosuppressive agent increasingly being used in liver transplant recipients. There is concern that sirolimus may be associated with wound complications and hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT). We have used sirolimus as primary immunosuppression in 170 liver transplant recipients and therefore reviewed our experience with wound complications and HAT in our cohort of patients. Records of all 170 patients administered sirolimus as primary immunosuppression and 180 historic controls were reviewed. Numbers of wound and hepatic artery complications were recorded, as well as the prevalence of obesity, reoperation, diabetes, and OKT3 use, all of which are risk factors for wound complications. The prevalence of wound complications was 12.4% in sirolimus-treated patients compared with 13.9% in historic controls (P = not significant [NS]). The prevalence of hepatic artery complications was 5.3% in sirolimus-treated patients compared with 8.3% in historic controls (P = NS). The prevalence of obesity and OKT3 administration was significantly lower in sirolimus-treated patients. Multivariate analysis failed to show an association between sirolimus therapy and hepatic artery or wound complications. The prevalence of wound and hepatic artery complications is not different in liver transplant recipients administered sirolimus as part of a primary immunosuppressive regimen compared with historic controls.

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