Retransplantation of liver: Primary graft nonfunction and hepatitis C virus are associated with worse outcome

Authors


Abstract

It is not known whether the outcome of liver retransplantation (re-LT) is dependent on the indication for re-LT or cause of liver disease. In this study, our aim is to compare the outcome of re-LT in adults with that of primary liver transplantation (PLT) and determine whether the outcome of re-LT is dependent on its indication. United Network for Organ Sharing data from 1988 to 2001 were used for the study. Of 34,267 patients who met our inclusion criteria, 761 patients underwent re-LT for primary graft nonfunction (PGNF; group 1), 3,428 patients underwent re-LT for other reasons (group 2), and 30,078 patients underwent PLT (group 3). There was a greater incidence of PGNF (9.4% v 4.0%; P < .001) and regrafting (23.1% v 7.4%; P < .001) in the re-LT groups compared with the PLT group. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis, after adjusting for confounding risk factors, showed significantly lower short- and long-term patient and graft survival in the re-LT groups compared with the PLT group. Kaplan-Meier survival showed lower patient and graft survival in group 1 compared with group 2. However, only graft, not patient, survival was lower in group 1 by Cox regression analysis when adjusted for other risk factors. Patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who underwent re-LT had lower patient and graft survival compared with those without HCV infection, and HCV was an independent predictor of mortality after re-LT. Re-LT was associated with a greater rate of complications and lower patient and graft survival compared with PLT. Re-LT for PGNF and HCV infection was associated with lower patient and graft survival compared with re-LT for other causes

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