Financial impact of adult living donation

Authors

  • Mark W. Russo,

    1. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Robert S. Brown Jr

    Corresponding author
    1. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY
    • Center for Liver Disease and Transplantation, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, 622 W 168th St, PH 14, New York, NY 10036. Telephone: 212-305-0662; FAX: 212-305-9139
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Key points

1. Cost analyses of living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and deceased-donor liver transplantation should capture costs incurred during the pretransplantation time period because benefits of LDLT likely result from reducing complications and cost pretransplantation.

2. Cost analyses should capture the costs associated with donor evaluation in LDLT since these costs are specific to LDLT and not associated with deceased-donor liver transplantation.

3. Indirect costs, such as time lost from work for donor and recipient, are difficult to estimate and frequently are not incorporated in cost-effectiveness analyses. However, they are important, particularly from a societal perspective.

Ancillary

Advertisement