Orthogonal View Analysis for Evaluating the Femoral Component Position of Total Hip Implants in Dogs Using Postoperative Radiographs

Authors

  • Carl T. Jehn DVM, BS,

    1. From the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, Comparative Orthopaedics Research Laboratory, Madison, WI.
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  • Mary Sarah Bergh BS,

    1. From the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, Comparative Orthopaedics Research Laboratory, Madison, WI.
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  • Paul A. Manley DVM, MSc, Diplomate ACVS

    1. From the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, Comparative Orthopaedics Research Laboratory, Madison, WI.
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  • Supported by a Student Research Fellowship Award, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  • Address reprint requests to Paul A. Manley, DVM, UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, 2015 Linden Drive West, Madison, WI 53706.

Abstract

Objective— To show the ability to obtain repeatable, accurate, quantitative data to assess the position of the femoral component of canine total hip implants using postoperative radiographs.

Study Design— Cadaveric study and clinical trial.

Animals— Five cadaveric canine femurs and 4 patients.

Methods— Femoral implants were placed into 5 cadaveric canine femurs in predetermined locations. Orthogonal radiographs were taken of each femur at 10° intervals as they were moved through a natural range of hip motion. An assessment of implant position was made with each set of radiographs and analyzed to observe significant inconsistencies in the values obtained when the femur was repositioned. Three investigators positioned and radiographed the hips of 4 client-owned dogs that had total hip arthroplasty (THA). Each investigator obtained a set of orthogonal radiographic views from which implant position was measured. The measurements obtained from each investigator's set of radiographs were statistically analyzed to evaluate for interobserver differences.

Results— The methods described indicate that consistent data regarding femoral implant placement can be obtained from postoperative radiographs of THA patients. Under most circumstances, change in position of the femur did not significantly affect femoral implant measurements. There were no significant differences noted among values obtained by different investigators.

Conclusions— Measurements based on the femoral and implant axes obtained from orthogonal radiographic views of the femur provide a means for obtaining accurate and consistent quantitative data regarding femoral implant position using postoperative radiographs of canine THA patients.

Clinical Relevance— Acquisition of quantitative information about femoral implant position using postoperative radiographs will facilitate development of a readily available data source. This information, attainable in a clinical setting, may help identify elements of implant position that are important in determining the clinical outcome of THA in dogs.

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