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Monopolar versus bipolar electrocoagulation in canine laparoscopic ovariectomy: A nonrandomized, prospective, clinical trial

Authors

  • Bart E. B. J. Van Goethem DVM,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
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  • Karin W. Rosenveldt DVM,

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
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  • Jolle Kirpensteijn DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVS, Diplomate ECVS

    1. From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
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  • Address reprints requests to Bart E. B. J. Van Goethem, DVM, Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, PO Box 80.154, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Objective— To compare the effect of using monopolar (MEC) or bipolar electrocoagulation (BEC) on surgical time for laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs and to evaluate the influence of age, weight and obesity, and estrus or pseudopregnancy on surgical time.

Study Design— Prospective, nonrandomized, clinical trial.

Animals— One hundred three female dogs.

Methods— Laparoscopic ovariectomy was performed with MEC or BEC by 1 surgeon using a standard protocol. Surgical time was recorded for the different procedural stages and was statistically evaluated for differences between MEC and BEC (χ2, Student t test, and ANOVA). The influence of significant variables was analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis.

Results— Mean surgical time was 47 minutes (range, 27 to 110 minutes). With BEC, surgical time was significantly shorter (41 minutes; P < .001) than with MEC (53 minutes). Obesity (56 vs. 42 minutes; P < .001) and intraoperative mesovarial bleeding (56 vs. 46 minutes; P= .03) increased surgical time. Dog age, estrus, and pseudopregnancy did not significantly influence surgical time.

Conclusions— BEC decreased laparoscopic ovariectomy time, decreased intraoperative hemorrhage, and, with the technique used, facilitated exteriorization of the ovaries.

Clinical Relevance— Laparoscopic ovariectomy can be performed more rapidly when using BEC instead of MEC and with less risk of mesovarial hemorrhage.

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