Encouraging practitioners to use resources: evaluation of the national implementation of a resource to improve the clinical management of alcohol-related problems in Indigenous primary care settings

Authors

  • Professor ERNEST HUNTER,

    Corresponding author
    1. North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland, Cairns, Queensland, Australia
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    • 3

      Ernest Hunter, Professor, North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland; Joanne Brown, Senior Project Officer, North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland; Brad McCullogh, Data Manager, Tropical Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, Australia.

  • JOANNE BROWN,

    1. North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland, Cairns, Queensland, Australia
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    • 3

      Ernest Hunter, Professor, North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland; Joanne Brown, Senior Project Officer, North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland; Brad McCullogh, Data Manager, Tropical Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, Australia.

  • BRAD MCCULLOCH

    1. Tropical Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, Queensland, Australia
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    • 3

      Ernest Hunter, Professor, North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland; Joanne Brown, Senior Project Officer, North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland; Brad McCullogh, Data Manager, Tropical Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, Australia.


North Queensland Health Equalities Promotion Unit, University of Queensland, PO Box 1103, Cairns, Queensland 4870, Australia. Tel: 07 4050 3670; Fax: 07 4051 4322; E-mail: Ernest_Hunter@health.qld.gov.au

Abstract

This paper reports on the evaluation of the implementation of the National Recommendations for the Clinical Management of Alcohol-Related Problems in Indigenous Primary Care Settings undertaken in 2001 through 74 standardized workshops, which sought to determine: (1) whether this approach to implementation influenced the likelihood that the National Recommendations would be used; (2) whether it influenced participants' willingness to engage with Indigenous patients regarding alcohol-related issues; and (3) whether the implementation as a whole influenced both practice and clinicians' willingness to engage. Evaluation included pre-/post-workshop and follow-up questionnaires and a focus group. The findings presented indicate that distribution of clinical resources alone is not sufficient to ensure use and that, particularly for medical practitioners, appropriate introduction not only increases use but also positively influences willingness to engage with alcohol-related problems as part of primary clinical care. Further, the enthusiasm for guideline production should be tempered by the need to develop effective implementation strategies.

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