Expanding knowledge among Aboriginal service providers on treatment options for excessive alcohol use

Authors

  • MAGGIE BRADY,

    Corresponding author
    1. Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Studies, Canberra
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      Maggie Brady BEd, MA, Visiting Research Fellow, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra, Australia;

  • SHARON DAWE,

    1. National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, Sydney
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      Sharon Dawe BA, MA (Hons), PhD, Research Officer, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (now at Department of Psychology, Griffith University, Qld 4111);

  • ROBYN RICHMOND

    1. National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
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      Robyn Richmond BA, MA, PhD, Head of Brief Intervention Unit, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales (now at School of Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)


AIATSIS, GPO Box 553, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia

Abstract

Approaches to the prevention of alcohol problems among Aboriginal people in Australia have tended to emphasize primary and tertiary prevention, while neglecting secondary prevention or early intervention. In contrast, members of the wider Australian community can now access a variety of early interventions through general practice, in hospital settings and through drug and alcohol treatment agencies. As part of a survey of the use of brief interventions, 178 agencies throughout Australia were interviewed, and findings are presented from the 29 agencies in this sample which provided services primarily for Aboriginal people. Approximately half offered a variety of approaches including brief interventions, with goals of moderation; the other half were entirely abstinence-orientated. These findings are discussed in the context of expanding the options that might be offered by Aboriginal-run agencies.

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